Design:
Evaluate
Patent & IP
Concept

Defining the concept

Whether you are an established company or a start-up inventor with a big idea, we understand that this project will be close to your heart. In the design phase we take your precious idea, evaluate its technical and commercial viability, investigate its IP protection and define the concept brief and specification based on how you want your idea to grow and where you want us to take you.

Concept evaluation

We have many years’ experience of taking ideas and turning them into realistic, workable and marketable designs. One of the key aspects of the new product design process is looking at an idea from different perspectives. We need to make sure we have considered every potential execution, otherwise the wrong idea may be chased down the development path To do this we brainstorm as many creative alternative solutions as possible before viewing each through the eyes of the consumer. As designers, we focus not only on answering the brief but also providing an element of novelty or unique functionality that suits the target market and sets a product apart from its competition. We call this adding the ‘bang’ – that little something that turns a good product into a great one and makes it stand out in the marketplace.

Patent and IP

Our experience has shown us that it’s important to think about intellectual property rights – patents, design rights, copyright and trade marks– early on, but only protect your idea when you’re 100% ready to do so. Intellectual property rights (IPR) is a broad and complex field. To patent an idea is the best known way of protecting it, however patents can sometimes not be the best form of protection. We can help you establish what form of IP protection you should be considering and talk through the different processes each from of IP requires. One of the most important questions is “when to protect?” We can advise on commercial aspects of patenting, however it’s critical to get advice from a qualified professional and we will introducing you to one of the many patent attorneys in our network with whom we have worked for many years.

What, who, and the four hows

For 15 years we have been fine tuning our evaluation model to ensure we are developing a commercially viable as well as technically feasible product concept. Not only have we tested this with our own product, that of our clients , but had our clients validate and test it too. For the last 5 years we have been using this method as a basis for a workshop we deliver at the British Libarary to help start up businesses. What is so unique? Who is it for? How do they get one? How much should they pay for it? How many people will buy it? How will they learn of the product? As designers, we find the answers to these questions goes a long way to fine tuning the design brief and specification of the product.

Design:
Evaluate
Patent & IP
Concept

Defining the concept

Whether you are an established company or a start-up inventor with a big idea, we understand that this project will be close to your heart. In the design phase we take your precious idea, evaluate its technical and commercial viability, investigate its IP protection and define the concept brief and specification based on how you want your idea to grow and where you want us to take you.

Concept evaluation

We have many years’ experience of taking ideas and turning them into realistic, workable and marketable designs. One of the key aspects of the new product design process is looking at an idea from different perspectives. We need to make sure we have considered every potential execution, otherwise the wrong idea may be chased down the development path To do this we brainstorm as many creative alternative solutions as possible before viewing each through the eyes of the consumer. As designers, we focus not only on answering the brief but also providing an element of novelty or unique functionality that suits the target market and sets a product apart from its competition. We call this adding the ‘bang’ – that little something that turns a good product into a great one and makes it stand out in the marketplace.

Patent and IP

Our experience has shown us that it’s important to think about intellectual property rights – patents, design rights, copyright and trade marks– early on, but only protect your idea when you’re 100% ready to do so. Intellectual property rights (IPR) is a broad and complex field. To patent an idea is the best known way of protecting it, however patents can sometimes not be the best form of protection. We can help you establish what form of IP protection you should be considering and talk through the different processes each from of IP requires. One of the most important questions is “when to protect?” We can advise on commercial aspects of patenting, however it’s critical to get advice from a qualified professional and we will introducing you to one of the many patent attorneys in our network with whom we have worked for many years.

What, who, and the four hows

For 15 years we have been fine tuning our evaluation model to ensure we are developing a commercially viable as well as technically feasible product concept. Not only have we tested this with our own product, that of our clients , but had our clients validate and test it too. For the last 5 years we have been using this method as a basis for a workshop we deliver at the British Libarary to help start up businesses. What is so unique? Who is it for? How do they get one? How much should they pay for it? How many people will buy it? How will they learn of the product? As designers, we find the answers to these questions goes a long way to fine tuning the design brief and specification of the product.

Design:
Evaluate
Patent & IP
Concept

Defining the concept

Whether you are an established company or a start-up inventor with a big idea, we understand that this project will be close to your heart. In the design phase we take your precious idea, evaluate its technical and commercial viability, investigate its IP protection and define the concept brief and specification based on how you want your idea to grow and where you want us to take you.

Concept evaluation

We have many years’ experience of taking ideas and turning them into realistic, workable and marketable designs. One of the key aspects of the new product design process is looking at an idea from different perspectives. We need to make sure we have considered every potential execution, otherwise the wrong idea may be chased down the development path To do this we brainstorm as many creative alternative solutions as possible before viewing each through the eyes of the consumer. As designers, we focus not only on answering the brief but also providing an element of novelty or unique functionality that suits the target market and sets a product apart from its competition. We call this adding the ‘bang’ – that little something that turns a good product into a great one and makes it stand out in the marketplace.

Patent and IP

Our experience has shown us that it’s important to think about intellectual property rights – patents, design rights, copyright and trade marks– early on, but only protect your idea when you’re 100% ready to do so. Intellectual property rights (IPR) is a broad and complex field. To patent an idea is the best known way of protecting it, however patents can sometimes not be the best form of protection. We can help you establish what form of IP protection you should be considering and talk through the different processes each from of IP requires. One of the most important questions is “when to protect?” We can advise on commercial aspects of patenting, however it’s critical to get advice from a qualified professional and we will introducing you to one of the many patent attorneys in our network with whom we have worked for many years.

What, who, and the four hows

For 15 years we have been fine tuning our evaluation model to ensure we are developing a commercially viable as well as technically feasible product concept. Not only have we tested this with our own product, that of our clients , but had our clients validate and test it too. For the last 5 years we have been using this method as a basis for a workshop we deliver at the British Libarary to help start up businesses. What is so unique? Who is it for? How do they get one? How much should they pay for it? How many people will buy it? How will they learn of the product? As designers, we find the answers to these questions goes a long way to fine tuning the design brief and specification of the product.