01 July 2019

A guide to product design terminology

Back

During the product design development process there are many acronyms and technical key-words that may be used. At Bang Creations we strive to communicate with clients clearly and concisely without using technical jargon, whilst maintaining a high level of technical detail. However, if you want to learn more about terminology often used by consultancies in the product design process, then this page will outline them for you:

Anthropometrics

This is data used in ergonomic design. Such as measurements of the human body.

CAD

Computer Aided Design is the use of computer software to accelerate the design process. At Bang Creations we use SolidWorks, which s a very powerful 3D CAD package, allowing us to rapidly communicate designs to manufacturers or clients. From these 3D models we can validate the physical properties with engineering simulation, rapid prototyping, as well as creating photo-realistic visual renders.

DFA

Design For Assembly, this means designing a product for easy assembly on the production line. This can be by using fewer parts, making components easier to join together, or using larger fixings. This reduces the manufacturing assembly time, reducing the cost of your product.

DFM

Design For Manufacture. This is the designing of components so that they can be effectively manufactured, for an efficient cost. This is particularly relevant to plastic injection moulded components, to design them in such a way so that the strength and surface finish is optimal. We often consider DFM most heavily in the detail and engineering design stages.

EMC Test

Electro-Magnetic Compatibility testing is used to verify that electronic products can function properly in an electromagnetic environment without introducing excessive electromagnetic fields into it's immediate environment.

Ergonomics

Ergonomics, also known as human factors, is the science concerned with the understanding of the limitations of human performance both physically and cognitively. This is then applied to the design of products and systems to fit the people that use them.

FEA

This is a computational engineering technique. Standing for Finite Element Analysis it allows us to virtually test the physical and thermal properties of components without having to prototype them.

FMEA

Failure Mode and Effects Analysis, this is a systematic process of analysing the way each component could fail (break), and the effects of the failure. From this we can optimise the longevity of the product.

FOB

Standing for Freight On Board. This is a cost that you will often get back from a manufacturer. It is the cost per unit for a full container of products, on a ship, ready to be transported.

Ideation

This is the initial process of creating ideas and concepts. We often use techniques such as brain storming, sketching, and prototyping. This is where we start bringing innovative elements to a product.

IP

Standing for Intellectual Property, this covers the protection of your product with patents, registered designs, and trademarks.

MOQ

Used by manufacturers, standing for Minimum Order Quantity. This is the minimum quantity of units they are willing to accept an order for. Often in the 1000's for plastic-based consumer products.

PPR

A PPR is a Product Profile Report. It is a technical document we include in a manufacturing handover package which describes the technical details of the product and components. It also includes basic manufacturing information.

PDR

A Product Development Report accompanies a PPR in a manufacturing handover package. It details how the product works, it's features, and any important considerations that are needed when manufacturing and assembling the product.

Rapid prototyping

Often used exclusively for 3D printing, it is the prototyping process of using 3D CAD to quickly create components from 3D printing to validate components without having to commit to expensive factory tooling.

VR

VR stands for Virtual Reality. It is the concept of creating a new environment and sensory experience for the user where anything is possible. Currently this is achieved using a headset which covers the eyes and or ears. However, some companies have also made 'haptic' clothing which allows you to also feel your virtual environment.

WLLL

Works Like Looks Like prototype. As the name implies, it is a prototype that looks and functions like the final manufactured product. However it will probably not be made in production materials.

Back

01 July 2019

A guide to product design terminology

Back

During the product design development process there are many acronyms and technical key-words that may be used. At Bang Creations we strive to communicate with clients clearly and concisely without using technical jargon, whilst maintaining a high level of technical detail. However, if you want to learn more about terminology often used by consultancies in the product design process, then this page will outline them for you:

Anthropometrics

This is data used in ergonomic design. Such as measurements of the human body.

CAD

Computer Aided Design is the use of computer software to accelerate the design process. At Bang Creations we use SolidWorks, which s a very powerful 3D CAD package, allowing us to rapidly communicate designs to manufacturers or clients. From these 3D models we can validate the physical properties with engineering simulation, rapid prototyping, as well as creating photo-realistic visual renders.

DFA

Design For Assembly, this means designing a product for easy assembly on the production line. This can be by using fewer parts, making components easier to join together, or using larger fixings. This reduces the manufacturing assembly time, reducing the cost of your product.

DFM

Design For Manufacture. This is the designing of components so that they can be effectively manufactured, for an efficient cost. This is particularly relevant to plastic injection moulded components, to design them in such a way so that the strength and surface finish is optimal. We often consider DFM most heavily in the detail and engineering design stages.

EMC Test

Electro-Magnetic Compatibility testing is used to verify that electronic products can function properly in an electromagnetic environment without introducing excessive electromagnetic fields into it's immediate environment.

Ergonomics

Ergonomics, also known as human factors, is the science concerned with the understanding of the limitations of human performance both physically and cognitively. This is then applied to the design of products and systems to fit the people that use them.

FEA

This is a computational engineering technique. Standing for Finite Element Analysis it allows us to virtually test the physical and thermal properties of components without having to prototype them.

FMEA

Failure Mode and Effects Analysis, this is a systematic process of analysing the way each component could fail (break), and the effects of the failure. From this we can optimise the longevity of the product.

FOB

Standing for Freight On Board. This is a cost that you will often get back from a manufacturer. It is the cost per unit for a full container of products, on a ship, ready to be transported.

Ideation

This is the initial process of creating ideas and concepts. We often use techniques such as brain storming, sketching, and prototyping. This is where we start bringing innovative elements to a product.

IP

Standing for Intellectual Property, this covers the protection of your product with patents, registered designs, and trademarks.

MOQ

Used by manufacturers, standing for Minimum Order Quantity. This is the minimum quantity of units they are willing to accept an order for. Often in the 1000's for plastic-based consumer products.

PPR

A PPR is a Product Profile Report. It is a technical document we include in a manufacturing handover package which describes the technical details of the product and components. It also includes basic manufacturing information.

PDR

A Product Development Report accompanies a PPR in a manufacturing handover package. It details how the product works, it's features, and any important considerations that are needed when manufacturing and assembling the product.

Rapid prototyping

Often used exclusively for 3D printing, it is the prototyping process of using 3D CAD to quickly create components from 3D printing to validate components without having to commit to expensive factory tooling.

VR

VR stands for Virtual Reality. It is the concept of creating a new environment and sensory experience for the user where anything is possible. Currently this is achieved using a headset which covers the eyes and or ears. However, some companies have also made 'haptic' clothing which allows you to also feel your virtual environment.

WLLL

Works Like Looks Like prototype. As the name implies, it is a prototype that looks and functions like the final manufactured product. However it will probably not be made in production materials.

01 July 2019

A guide to product design terminology

Back

During the product design development process there are many acronyms and technical key-words that may be used. At Bang Creations we strive to communicate with clients clearly and concisely without using technical jargon, whilst maintaining a high level of technical detail. However, if you want to learn more about terminology often used by consultancies in the product design process, then this page will outline them for you:

Anthropometrics

This is data used in ergonomic design. Such as measurements of the human body.

CAD

Computer Aided Design is the use of computer software to accelerate the design process. At Bang Creations we use SolidWorks, which s a very powerful 3D CAD package, allowing us to rapidly communicate designs to manufacturers or clients. From these 3D models we can validate the physical properties with engineering simulation, rapid prototyping, as well as creating photo-realistic visual renders.

DFA

Design For Assembly, this means designing a product for easy assembly on the production line. This can be by using fewer parts, making components easier to join together, or using larger fixings. This reduces the manufacturing assembly time, reducing the cost of your product.

DFM

Design For Manufacture. This is the designing of components so that they can be effectively manufactured, for an efficient cost. This is particularly relevant to plastic injection moulded components, to design them in such a way so that the strength and surface finish is optimal. We often consider DFM most heavily in the detail and engineering design stages.

EMC Test

Electro-Magnetic Compatibility testing is used to verify that electronic products can function properly in an electromagnetic environment without introducing excessive electromagnetic fields into it's immediate environment.

Ergonomics

Ergonomics, also known as human factors, is the science concerned with the understanding of the limitations of human performance both physically and cognitively. This is then applied to the design of products and systems to fit the people that use them.

FEA

This is a computational engineering technique. Standing for Finite Element Analysis it allows us to virtually test the physical and thermal properties of components without having to prototype them.

FMEA

Failure Mode and Effects Analysis, this is a systematic process of analysing the way each component could fail (break), and the effects of the failure. From this we can optimise the longevity of the product.

FOB

Standing for Freight On Board. This is a cost that you will often get back from a manufacturer. It is the cost per unit for a full container of products, on a ship, ready to be transported.

Ideation

This is the initial process of creating ideas and concepts. We often use techniques such as brain storming, sketching, and prototyping. This is where we start bringing innovative elements to a product.

IP

Standing for Intellectual Property, this covers the protection of your product with patents, registered designs, and trademarks.

MOQ

Used by manufacturers, standing for Minimum Order Quantity. This is the minimum quantity of units they are willing to accept an order for. Often in the 1000's for plastic-based consumer products.

PPR

A PPR is a Product Profile Report. It is a technical document we include in a manufacturing handover package which describes the technical details of the product and components. It also includes basic manufacturing information.

PDR

A Product Development Report accompanies a PPR in a manufacturing handover package. It details how the product works, it's features, and any important considerations that are needed when manufacturing and assembling the product.

Rapid prototyping

Often used exclusively for 3D printing, it is the prototyping process of using 3D CAD to quickly create components from 3D printing to validate components without having to commit to expensive factory tooling.

VR

VR stands for Virtual Reality. It is the concept of creating a new environment and sensory experience for the user where anything is possible. Currently this is achieved using a headset which covers the eyes and or ears. However, some companies have also made 'haptic' clothing which allows you to also feel your virtual environment.

WLLL

Works Like Looks Like prototype. As the name implies, it is a prototype that looks and functions like the final manufactured product. However it will probably not be made in production materials.