16 December 2019

2020’s insights introduction – Part one

Back

We think that product design is the creation of solutions that improve people's lives but do not harm the lives of others, or the planet, in the process. As we approach the end of this decade, we are waking up to the damage that products have inflicted on the world and its inhabitants. Part 1 of our 2020’s Insights examines how businesses should embrace sustainable design thinking. 

But why? We know the environmental motivations for sustainable design, but does it make commercial sense? The big issue facing businesses is how to bridge the gap between those who can afford the inconvenience and cost of using sustainable solutions and those who can’t.

According to the Office of National  Statistics, in 2019, the proportion of people in "low-paid, part-time employment" was three times that of people in "full-time employment." In a marketplace where over 75% of the UK population are worried about money, are they going to be concerned about more expensive, but sustainably-designed, products?

A good friend and client pointed out that “there may be a gap in the market, but that does not mean there is a market in that gap." 

But this is different. Before the recent election, many schools ran mock elections. At the time of writing this article, we have not heard of one school that did not vote the Greens in.

In the insights, we discuss GenerationZ; the first generation born in a digital world. They are demanding change. They expect sustainable solutions and feel let down when there isn’t one. Society is turning to designers and businesses to deliver the solution not just because it is the right thing to do, but because it makes them money.

We believe if you do not have a sustainable index or strategy in place for the decade to come, you cannot grow as a business and risk alienating consumers.

This will be the decade where consumers will buy less, consider more and expect sustainably designed products. 

 

Part One Insights:

  • 01 Innovation will be harder to market: In an age of mass media and short attention span, how do you visually communicate innovation? Read here

 

  • 02 Design products that people need: As people begin to place value in experience, how can product necessity be calculated? Read here

 

  • 03 Design products that last: With GenerationZ waking up to hyper-consumerism, how will their product investment be effected? Read here

 

  • 04 Recycle for a product narrative: How does the use of recycled material help to increase product marketability? Read here

 

  • 05 Bioplastics will continue to grow… and decompose: With 91% of the world's plastic not being recycled, how will major-player packaging corporations respond to the demand for bioplastic alternatives? Read here

 

  • 06 No pack is better than green pack: How will packaging reduction affect designers' ability to communicate a product's function? Read here

 

  • 07 Circular economy is the new economy: As we strive towards a circular economy, what will be the growth opportunity for future product design? Read here

 

  • 08 Customers will see their investment as a lease: How will design thinking steer business models to be more inherently sustainable? Read here

 

  • 09 Customers will be loyal to brands: With increased customer loyalty, how will brands appeal to a broader target market? Read here

 

  • 10 Products must be sustainable: How will product sustainability effect the mindset and spending habits of Generation Z? Read here

Back

16 December 2019

2020’s insights introduction – Part one

Back

We think that product design is the creation of solutions that improve people's lives but do not harm the lives of others, or the planet, in the process. As we approach the end of this decade, we are waking up to the damage that products have inflicted on the world and its inhabitants. Part 1 of our 2020’s Insights examines how businesses should embrace sustainable design thinking. 

But why? We know the environmental motivations for sustainable design, but does it make commercial sense? The big issue facing businesses is how to bridge the gap between those who can afford the inconvenience and cost of using sustainable solutions and those who can’t.

According to the Office of National  Statistics, in 2019, the proportion of people in "low-paid, part-time employment" was three times that of people in "full-time employment." In a marketplace where over 75% of the UK population are worried about money, are they going to be concerned about more expensive, but sustainably-designed, products?

A good friend and client pointed out that “there may be a gap in the market, but that does not mean there is a market in that gap." 

But this is different. Before the recent election, many schools ran mock elections. At the time of writing this article, we have not heard of one school that did not vote the Greens in.

In the insights, we discuss GenerationZ; the first generation born in a digital world. They are demanding change. They expect sustainable solutions and feel let down when there isn’t one. Society is turning to designers and businesses to deliver the solution not just because it is the right thing to do, but because it makes them money.

We believe if you do not have a sustainable index or strategy in place for the decade to come, you cannot grow as a business and risk alienating consumers.

This will be the decade where consumers will buy less, consider more and expect sustainably designed products. 

 

Part One Insights:

  • 01 Innovation will be harder to market: In an age of mass media and short attention span, how do you visually communicate innovation? Read here

 

  • 02 Design products that people need: As people begin to place value in experience, how can product necessity be calculated? Read here

 

  • 03 Design products that last: With GenerationZ waking up to hyper-consumerism, how will their product investment be effected? Read here

 

  • 04 Recycle for a product narrative: How does the use of recycled material help to increase product marketability? Read here

 

  • 05 Bioplastics will continue to grow… and decompose: With 91% of the world's plastic not being recycled, how will major-player packaging corporations respond to the demand for bioplastic alternatives? Read here

 

  • 06 No pack is better than green pack: How will packaging reduction affect designers' ability to communicate a product's function? Read here

 

  • 07 Circular economy is the new economy: As we strive towards a circular economy, what will be the growth opportunity for future product design? Read here

 

  • 08 Customers will see their investment as a lease: How will design thinking steer business models to be more inherently sustainable? Read here

 

  • 09 Customers will be loyal to brands: With increased customer loyalty, how will brands appeal to a broader target market? Read here

 

  • 10 Products must be sustainable: How will product sustainability effect the mindset and spending habits of Generation Z? Read here

16 December 2019

2020’s insights introduction – Part one

Back

We think that product design is the creation of solutions that improve people's lives but do not harm the lives of others, or the planet, in the process. As we approach the end of this decade, we are waking up to the damage that products have inflicted on the world and its inhabitants. Part 1 of our 2020’s Insights examines how businesses should embrace sustainable design thinking. 

But why? We know the environmental motivations for sustainable design, but does it make commercial sense? The big issue facing businesses is how to bridge the gap between those who can afford the inconvenience and cost of using sustainable solutions and those who can’t.

According to the Office of National  Statistics, in 2019, the proportion of people in "low-paid, part-time employment" was three times that of people in "full-time employment." In a marketplace where over 75% of the UK population are worried about money, are they going to be concerned about more expensive, but sustainably-designed, products?

A good friend and client pointed out that “there may be a gap in the market, but that does not mean there is a market in that gap." 

But this is different. Before the recent election, many schools ran mock elections. At the time of writing this article, we have not heard of one school that did not vote the Greens in.

In the insights, we discuss GenerationZ; the first generation born in a digital world. They are demanding change. They expect sustainable solutions and feel let down when there isn’t one. Society is turning to designers and businesses to deliver the solution not just because it is the right thing to do, but because it makes them money.

We believe if you do not have a sustainable index or strategy in place for the decade to come, you cannot grow as a business and risk alienating consumers.

This will be the decade where consumers will buy less, consider more and expect sustainably designed products. 

 

Part One Insights:

  • 01 Innovation will be harder to market: In an age of mass media and short attention span, how do you visually communicate innovation? Read here

 

  • 02 Design products that people need: As people begin to place value in experience, how can product necessity be calculated? Read here

 

  • 03 Design products that last: With GenerationZ waking up to hyper-consumerism, how will their product investment be effected? Read here

 

  • 04 Recycle for a product narrative: How does the use of recycled material help to increase product marketability? Read here

 

  • 05 Bioplastics will continue to grow… and decompose: With 91% of the world's plastic not being recycled, how will major-player packaging corporations respond to the demand for bioplastic alternatives? Read here

 

  • 06 No pack is better than green pack: How will packaging reduction affect designers' ability to communicate a product's function? Read here

 

  • 07 Circular economy is the new economy: As we strive towards a circular economy, what will be the growth opportunity for future product design? Read here

 

  • 08 Customers will see their investment as a lease: How will design thinking steer business models to be more inherently sustainable? Read here

 

  • 09 Customers will be loyal to brands: With increased customer loyalty, how will brands appeal to a broader target market? Read here

 

  • 10 Products must be sustainable: How will product sustainability effect the mindset and spending habits of Generation Z? Read here